Find yourself in the middle of a Spanish festival with this vibrant language dancing around you. These categories will start you off on your adventure into the Spanish lands of Castilian.
         
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Spanish language tutors have recorded these words and phrases for you to learn. Click on each word to hear how it sounds.
1.A -America
A-Amrica


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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2.April
Abril


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3.August
Agosto


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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4.Autum
Otoo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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5.B-Barcelona
B-Barcelona


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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6.Black
Negro


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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7.Blue
Azul


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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8.C- Ciudad Real
C-Ciudad Real


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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9.Can I go...?
Puedo ir...?


Tutor: Jared K
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10.D-(Denmark)
D-Dinamarca


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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11.December
Diciembre


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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12.E- Spain
E-Espaa


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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13.Eight
Ocho


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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14.Eighth
Octavo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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15.Excuse me
Disculpe


Tutor: Tiffany Charlton
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16.F- France
F-Francia


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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17.February
Febrero


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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18.Fifth
Quinto


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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19.First
Primer, primero


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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20.Five
Cinco


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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21.Four
Cuatro


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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22.Fourth
Cuarto


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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23.Friday
Viernes


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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24.G-Galicia
G-Galicia


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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25.Good afternoon - Good evening
Buenas tardes


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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26.Good bye
Adis


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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27.Good morning
Buenos das


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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28.Good morning.
Buenos dias.


Tutor: Yisell Lopez
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29.Good night
Buenas noches


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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30.Green
Verde


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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31.Grey
Gris


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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32.H - Hamburg
H - Hamburgo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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33.Hello
Hola


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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34.Hey, What's Up?
Hey, Que onda?


Tutor: Jessica Perez
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35.I have a cold.
Tengo un resfriado. Tengo catarro.


Tutor: Richard de Meij
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36.I- Italy
I- Italia


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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37.It is time for..
Es la hora para...


Tutor: Jared K
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38.J - Jan
J - Jan


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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39.January
Enero


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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40.July
Julio


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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41.June
Junio


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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42.K - Kansas
K - Kansas


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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43.L - Luxembourg
L -Luxemburgo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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44.M - Madrid
M - Madrid


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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45.March
Marzo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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46.May
Mayo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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47.Monday
Lunes


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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48. - (only in the Spanish alphabet) Spain, Spanier, Spanish
- Espaa, Espaol


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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49.N - Nicaragua
N - Nicaragua


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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50.Nine
Nueve


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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51.Nineth
Noveno


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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52.November
Noviembre


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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53.O - Orlando
O - Orlando


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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54.October
Octubre


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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55.One
Un, Uno


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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56.Orange
Naranja


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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57.P - Poland
P - Polonia


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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58.Pink
Rosa


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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59.Purple
Morado-Violeta-Prpura


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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60.Q - Quito
Q - Quito


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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61.R - Rome
R - Roma


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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62.Red
Rojo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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63.S - Seville
S - Sevilla


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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64.Saturday
Sbado


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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65.Second
Segundo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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66.See you later
Hasta luego


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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67.See you soon
Hasta pronto


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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68.See you tomorrow
Hasta maana


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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69.September
Septiembre


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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70.Seven
Siete


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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71.Seventh
Sptimo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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72.Six
Seis


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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73.Sixth
Sexto


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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74.sorry
lo siento


Tutor: Jared K
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75.Spring
Primavera


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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76.Summer
Verano


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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77.Sunday
Domingo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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78.T - Toledo
T - Toledo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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79.Take care
Cudese, cudate


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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80.Ten
Diez


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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81.Tenth
Dcimo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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82.The seasons
las estaciónes


Tutor: Jared K
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83.Third
Tercer, tercero


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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84.Three
Tres


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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85.Thursday
Jueves


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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86.Tuesday
Martes


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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87.Two
Dos


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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88.U - Uruguay
U - Uruguay


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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89.V - Valencia
V - Valencia


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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90.W - Washington
W - Washington


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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91.Wednesday
Mircoles


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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92.White
Blanco


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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93.Winter
Invierno


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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94.X - Xauen, Mxico
X - Xauen, Mxico


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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95.Y - Yemen
Y - Yemen


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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96.Yellow
Amarillo


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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97.Z - Zaragoza
Z - Zaragoza


Tutor: Leonor Barrientos
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About the Spanish language

Spanish is the most widely spoken of the Romance languages, both in terms of number of speakers and the number of countries in which it is the dominant language. It is the mother tongue of some 320 million people scattered throughout the world – in the Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands, in parts of Morocco and the west coast of Africa.

It is the official language of all the South American republics, with the exception of Brazil and Guyana. Naturally the Spanish spoken in all these places appears in many varieties. In fact the differences between Castilian Spanish and Latin American Spanish are equivalent to those between British English and American English.

The Spanish vocabulary is of Latin origin, though many of the words differ markedly from their counterparts in French and Italian. Prolonged contact with Germanic and later Arabic affected its evolution but did not risk the decrease in Romance speaking. Germanic and Arabic have left their mark on the Spanish language as words like 'guerra' – war and 'algebra' – maths can both be traced back to their respective Germanic and Arabic origins.

More Spanish language facts

Spanish Grammatics
A few notes about spanish grammatics

Nouns - Nouns are the naming words in a language; such as man, waiter, hotel, house, girl, flower. The important thing to remember about Spanish nouns is that they are either masculine or feminine (male or female). In other words, each Spanish noun falls into one of these two 'gender' categories.

MASCULINE NOUNS
i.e. el hombre (the man)
i.e. los hombres (the men)

NOTES ON MASCULINE NOUNS
In the singular, 'el' means 'the'
In the plural, 'los' means 'the'
The 's' on the noun (hombres) in the second example makes it plural

FEMININE NOUNS
i.e. la casa (the house)
i.e. las casas (the houses)

NOTES ON FEMININE NOUNS
In the singular, 'la' means 'the'
In the plural, 'las' means 'the'
The 's' on the noun (casas) in the second example makes it plural

NOTES ON ALL NOUNS
If the noun ends in a consonant, add 'es' in the plural.
EXAMPLES:
The hotel/s ... el hotel - los hoteles (masculine)
The flower/s ... la flor - las flores (feminine)

ADJECTIVES are the describing words in a language; such as red, big, attractive, new. The important thing to remember about Spanish adjectives is that they MUST AGREE with the nouns they describe. If the noun is masculine, so must its describing adjective. Similarly, if the noun is singular, so must the adjective be.

MASCULINE NOUNS PLUS ADJECTIVES
i.e. el hombre grande (the big man)
i.e. los hombres grandes (the big men)

i.e. el hospital nuevo (the new hospital)
i.e. los hospitales nuevos (the new hospitals)

FEMININE NOUNS PLUS ADJECTIVES
i.e. la casa roja (the red house)
i.e. las casas rojas (the red houses)

i.e. la tienda nueva (the new shop)
i.e. las tiendas nuevas (the new shops)

NOTES ON ADJECTIVES
put your adjective after the noun (in English we do it the other way round)
add 's' to make your adjective plural
change the 'o' on the end of the adjective to an 'a' to make it feminine

VERBS are the 'doing' or 'action' words in a language; such as eat, drink, do, think, jump. Verbs in Spanish fall into the Irregular or Regular categories. Irregular verbs do not 'behave', but regular ones follow a standard formula. It's these we'll have a look at now.

There are 3 Groups of regular verbs, those which end in -ar, -er, and -ir.

Given that -ir verbs are less common in Spanish, we'll focus on -ar and - er.

Here's an example of a common -ar verb: HABLAR (to speak). It goes like this:

hablo - I speak
hablas - You speak
habla - He/She/It speaks
hablamos - We speak
hablaís - You speak (plural)
hablan - They speak

So, the trick is this. Take only the 'stem' of the verb (all except the last two letters) and add the following endings: o, as, a, amos, aís, an

Here's another example. FUMAR (to smoke)

fumo - I smoke
fumas - You smoke
fuma - He/She/It smokes
fumamos - We smoke
fumaís - You smoke (plural)
fuman - They smoke

Check out the endings! Just like the HABLAR example.

-er verbs are almost identical. Just alter the -a after the verb stem to an -e. Like this:

COMER (to eat)

como - I eat
comes - You eat
come - He/She/It eats
comemos - We eat
comeís - You eat (plural)
comen - They eat

We now know that VERBS are the 'doing' or 'action' words in a language; such as eat, drink, do, think, jump. We also know that verbs in Spanish fall into an Irregular or Regular category.

Time now to see what happens to IRREGULAR Verbs.

We'll look at the verb SER as a first example because it's the most important verb in Spanish (so many of the irregular verbs are those most commonly used in a language).

Trouble is, these verbs do not behave as we might hope - hence the tag 'irregular'. Just look what happens to this one:

SER 'To be'
Soy - I am
Eres - You are
Es - He is
Somos - We are
Sois - You are (plural)
Son - They are

You've got to memorise all the forms of these irregulars when you come across them because they contain little or no pattern to help you (unlike the formulaic regular verbs).

Anyway, SER is used to talk about origin and characteristics:

Soy de Londres (I am from London)
Soy inglés (I am English)

Have a look at this:

Eres inglés - You are English
Eres inglés? - Are you English?
No eres ingles - You are not English
No eres ingles? - Aren't you English?
Eres ingles, no? - You are English, aren't you?

Future Tense - Now to an irregular verb which is not only common; it is also used in a nice grammatical formula to express the future.

IR (to go) Voy - I go Vas - You go Va - He/She/It goes Vamos - We go Vais - You go (plural) Van - They go

It's an unusual looking verb alright, but try to get used to it because it'll enable you to talk about future events in Spanish, not just things happening in what's called the Present Simple tense (that's the one we've seen so far).

Before we see the Future in action, you might recognise 'Vamos!' ('Let's go!) They often use that one in the Western movies.

Look at this: Voy a hablar español - I am going to to speak Spanish. NOW WE ARE INTO THE FUTURE!!

It's all about following this formula: IR + A + INFINITIVE OF VERB (in the above example 'to speak')

Here's another example: Vas a comer patatas fritas? - Are you going to eat chips?

Returning to Vamos for a moment, check this one out: Vamos a tomar una cerveza! - We are going to drink a beer, or Let's drink a beer!

Questions - Communicating in a foreign language is often about Question and Answer, so let's check out how to form some common questions. We've already seen how easy it is to form basic questions in Spanish - just add a question mark and speak your sentence in the style of a question. For example: Estás bien - you are well ... ¿Estás bien? - are you well?

Here now are some of the common 'question words' (and how to pronounce them) used to start sentences in Spanish:

¿Cómo? komo how
¿Qué? kay what
¿Por qué? pour kay why
¿Cuál? kwal which
¿Cuándo? kwando when
¿Cuánto? kwanto how much
¿Cuántos? kwantoss how many
¿Quién? key-en who ¿Dónde? donday where

Here are a few in action:

¿Dónde estás? where are you?
¿Quién es? who is it?
¿Cuánto es? how much is it?
¿Cómo están? how are they?
By the way, do you like the upside-down ¿question mark? The Spanish language uses ¿ to denote where the question begins and ? to show where it ends. For example, "Buenós días, ¿Cómo estás?" Hello, how are you?

To do the upside-down question mark press ALT 168 on your keyboard.

Past Tense - we'll now look at the 'preterite' or 'past simple' tense. It's enough to call this more strightforwardly the Past Tense if you prefer. If you have been following the lessons carefully (and I know some of you have!) you should now be able to express yourself in the present and future tenses. So it's time to learn how to speak Spanish in the Past.

Is that difficult? Not really, but once again you have to learn the formula to apply to the verbs.

Here we go with a regular -ar verb, our old friend 'HABLAR', 'to speak':

Hablé - I spoke
Hablaste - You spoke
Habló - He/She/It spoke
Hablamos - We spoke
Hablasteís - You spoke (plural)
Hablaron - They spoke

NB Yes, the 1st person plural 'we' form looks exactly like the present 'we speak' Now an -er verb in the preterite: Comer - to eat

Comí - I ate
Comiste - You ate
Comió - He/She/It ate
Comimos - We ate
Comisteís - You ate (plural)
Comieron - They ate

Although the verb 'to eat' is irregular in English (we do not say 'eated') it is regular in Spanish. BUT - there's always a 'but' isn't there! - once again there are the irregular verbs in Spanish with forms all of their own in the preterite. Interestingly both SER and IR, two verbs we've explored previously, have exactly the same form in the preterite; one worth learning:

Fuí - I went/ I was
Fuiste - You went / You were
Fue - He/She/It went / was
Fuimos - We went / were
Fuisteís - You went / were (plural)
Fueron - They went / were